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Jasmine (Jasminum spp.)

Background | Evidence Table | Traditional Uses | Dosing | Safety | Interactions | Attribution

Synonyms

Catalonian jasmine, common jasmine, common white jasmine, Italian jasmine, jasmin, jasmine flower, Jasmini Flos, Jasminum, Jasminum grandiflorum, Jasminum officinale, jati, jessamine, mo li hua, pikake (Hawaiian), poet's jasmine, poet's jessamine, royal jasmine, sambac (Pilipino) , Spanish jasmine, yasmin (Persian), yeh-hsi-ming.

Background

Jasmine (Jasminum spp.) is a woody, perennial climbing plant that is well known for its sweet, highly scented flowers. The flowers and oil are used in perfumes, essential oils, food flavorings, and tea.

Jasmine flower has been used in aromatherapy for depression, nervousness, coughs, relaxation, and tension. Early studies have shown that jasmine may help with alertness and memory improvement.

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Evidence Table

Disclaimer: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Stroke

Limited population study found that tea drinking may decrease risk of stroke; however, use of jasmine tea had less of an effect than black or green teas. This indicates that the reduction of stroke risk may not be related to jasmine. Additional study using jasmine alone is needed to make a conclusion.

Grade: C

Memory improvement

Early human studies have not shown a benefit of jasmine scent for memory recall. More research is needed in this area.

Grade: C

Lactation suppression

In the Ayurvedic tradition, jasmine has been used to reduce the secretion of breast milk. Early human study found that application of jasmine flowers to the breast decreased breast engorgement and milk production. More higher-quality studies are needed to confirm these results.

Grade: C

Alertness

Jasmine is commonly used in aromatherapy as a relaxing, yet stimulating herb. However, preliminary study did not show an increase in alertness in subjects who used jasmine essential oil. More research is needed in this area.

Grade: C

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Traditional Uses

Disclaimer: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Acne, air purification, amenorrhea (lack of menstruation), anger, antibacterial, antifungal, antiseptic, antiviral, aphrodisiac (especially in women), aromatherapy, astringent, breast milk stimulant, burning eyes, calming, cancer, canker sores, childbirth, conjunctivitis, constipation, corns, cough, depression, ear discharge, earache, exhaustion, eye disorders, facial paralysis, fragrance, gas, hair growth, headaches, hearing loss, heart rate abnormalities, high blood pressure, hoarseness, impotence, infections, insect bites, insomnia, laryngitis, leprosy, liver disease, liver inflammation, loose teeth, menstrual flow stimulant, mood enhancement, muscle spasms, muscle tension, nervous system function, painful menstruation, palpitations, paralysis, parasitic worm infections, premenstrual syndrome, pruritus, respiratory tract mucous membrane inflammation, sedative, skin inflammation, sprains, sterility, stress, sunstroke, toothache, ulcers, urinary disorders, uterine disorders, wound healing.

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Dosing

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for jasmine, and use in children is not recommended.

Adults (18 years and older)

Jasmine has been taken by mouth as a tea or tincture. Jasmine essential oil is used in aromatherapy. Jasmine essential oil should not be taken by mouth.

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Safety

Disclaimer: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Jasmine is not recommended in pregnant or breast feeding women. When jasmine flowers are applied to the breast, breast milk production may stop.

Side Effects and Warnings

When essential oils, including jasmine essential oil, are consumed orally, they are potentially unsafe as they are extremely potent and can be poisonous.

Allergies

Avoid with a known allergy or sensitivity to jasmine, it constituents, or members of the Oleaceae family, or with a known allergy or sensitivity to fragrances such as ylang-ylang, lemongrass, narcissus, and sandalwood.

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Interactions

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Jasmine may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in patients taking herbs or supplements that lower blood pressure.

Jasmine may also have additive effects when taken with antifungals, anti-anxiety herbs or supplements, and diuretics.

Interactions with Drugs

Jasmine may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in patients taking drugs that lower blood pressure.

Jasmine may also have additive effects when taken with antifungals, anti-anxiety drugs, and diuretics.

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Attribution

This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature, and was peer-reviewed and edited by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com): Tracee Rae Abrams, PharmD (University of Rhode Island); Dawn Costa, BA, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Nicole Giese, MS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Catherine Ulbricht, PharmD (Massachusetts General Hospital).

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